BREEDS

Tropical fish come in all shapes and sizes––top and mid feeders to bottom feeders, round, flat, whiskered and long-finned varieties, here are some of the most common.

Black-Skirt Tetra

Like the Neon Tetra, these fish are also schooling fish. But since they are larger, they require more space.

Cherry Barb

Also considered to be somewhat aggressive, Cherry barbs are relatively active schooling fish and tend to do well when mixed with other active species.

Cory Catfish

Known for their peaceful nature, these fish are a great addition to any community tank.

 

Guppies

Guppies are colorful tropical fish that are easy to care for, making them a perfect choice for those new to aquarium keeping.

Harlequin Rasbora

These peaceful top feeders are perfect for new fishkeepers and can add a splash of color to any existing tank.

Mollies

Great for beginners, molly fish are extremely adaptable and hardy. There is, however, a vast difference between each type, so be sure to research the optimal tank conditions for the type you select.

Neon Tetra

Tiny but incredibly vibrant, Neon Tetras are schooling fish. Meaning, they thrive in groups. We recommend getting at least six to start.

Pearl Gourami

Hardy and easy to care for, these fish are one of the most popular Gourami fish among aquarium owners. Like many other types of Gourami, they do require space at the top of the tank to breathe air.

Platies

These fish have a very peaceful disposition and are perfect for mixing in a community tank with other non-aggressive fish.

Swordtails

Perfect for those new to the hobby, Swordtails thrive in communities. We recommend getting at least five or more to start.

Tiger Plecos

This beautiful bottom feeder, while peaceful, can be a bit territorial. We recommend filling the bottom of your tank with rocks and ornaments to give them a place to roam and call their own.

Zebra Danio

These black-and-white striped beauties can be slightly aggressive. At the same time, they can do well in mixed groups of fish when properly cared for and fed.

ENVIRONMENTS

We recommend our 20-gallon aquarium or larger, because larger tanks are easier to care for than smaller ones. The environment is up to you — funky fun décor with artificial plants or live plants with wood or stone to recreate an environment found in nature. The options are endless.

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